Syllabus Bank


A finely crafted syllabus is one of the best antidotes to positivist historicism, because instead of just doing the default period-driven grabbag (“Mid Victorian Literature”) it can create a narrative or make an argument, and focus on conceptual or formal concerns (“Mid-Victorian Experiments in Omniscience and the Science of Mind”). Affiliates have contributed syllabi below; we hope they’ll be of use! Send us yours for inclusion too!

Reading Like Victorians – Ryan Fong
Victorian Women Write The Erotic – Ryan Fong
The Cultural Work of Emotion in the Victorian Novel – Carolyn Betensky
Victorian Outliers – Carolyn Betensky
Victorian Lit and Photography – David Coombs
Sensing the City – Emily Steinlight
We Other Victorians – Emily Steinlight
World Literature: The Case of the Nineteenth Century – Caroline Levine
Aesthetics in a World of Prose – Jonathan Farina
The Other Victorians – Nathan K. Hensley
Tragic Ecologies – Nathan K. Hensley
Victorian Lit and Globalization – Nathan K. Hensley
Faith and Doubt – Jonathan Farina
Environments of Literature – Benjamin Morgan
Victorian Speculative Fiction – Benjamin Morgan
Victorian Lit as World Lit – Sebastian Lecourt
Empire and Print Culture – Tanya Agathocleous
Art, Sex, & Death – Dr. Dustin Friedman
Victorian Doubles – Mary Mullen
Nineteenth Century Gender and Sexuality – Annie Swafford
Virtually London – Annie Swafford
Digital Tools for the 21st Century – Annie Swafford
Novel Worlds: Realism, Structuralism, Aesthetics – Anna Kornbluh
Sex and the City – Anna Kornbluh
Freud and Victoria – Anna Kornbluh
Seriality – Susan David Bernstein
The Victorians, Then and Now – Amy Wong
Weird Victorians– Anne Jamison
Before and After Sexuality – Matthew Rowlinson
The Shock of the Old: Forms of Victorian Anachronism – Matthew Rawlinson
Serializing the Victorian Survey – Steven Venturino
Women Write the Empire – Amy Kahrmann Huseby
James and Conrad – Josh Epstein

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